Monday, September 19, 2016

Meet the Old Math Guys




Who are the Old Math Guys?
A few years ago I was teaching exponent rules to my eighth graders and I was looking for an engaging, meaningful way to practice with them.  I was wracking my brain for fun matching activities and it hit me.  Old Maid was one of my favorite games to play as a little kid. 
A few years ago I was teaching exponent rules to my eighth graders and I was looking for an engaging, meaningful way to practice with them.  I was wracking my brain for fun matching activities and it hit me.  Old Maid was one of my favorite games to play as a little kid. This was perfect because there are two truths I know for sure about my eighth grade students:
1)     They are super competitive.
2)   They secretly love games from their childhood.
Thus Old Math Guy was born! 
{Although, true story, it wasn’t until weeks or months later when I was writing in my plan book that I realized the initials were OMG.}

So Old Math Guy is played just like Old Maid.  Ideally I like my students in groups of 5.  There are 35 cards in a deck so each student gets 7.
A few years ago I was teaching exponent rules to my eighth graders and I was looking for an engaging, meaningful way to practice with them.  I was wracking my brain for fun matching activities and it hit me.  Old Maid was one of my favorite games to play as a little kid. First, they look at their cards to see if there are any pairs.
Then, one at a time, they go around in a circle selecting a new card from the person to their right, checking to see if they have a pair, then allowing the student on their left to select a card from them.
The twist!  There is one Old Math Guy card that has no match.  Whoever has him at the end loses.
The student who loses the game is typcailly in charge of clean up.
If students match all their cards before the end of the game, I say they are “safe” and they enjoy watching the rest of the game play out. 
A few years ago I was teaching exponent rules to my eighth graders and I was looking for an engaging, meaningful way to practice with them.  I was wracking my brain for fun matching activities and it hit me.  Old Maid was one of my favorite games to play as a little kid.


The original Old Math Guy was cute in his own way.  I designed him myself in PowerPoint.  J
 The original Old Math Guy was cute in his own way.  I designed him myself in PowerPoint.  J

Then I came to a point when I wanted the game to look a little more polished so I hired the amazingly talented Sarah Pecorino to redesign Old Math Guy and – voila – the adorable, ethnically diverse Old Math Guys were born. 

A few years ago I was teaching exponent rules to my eighth graders and I was looking for an engaging, meaningful way to practice with them.  I was wracking my brain for fun matching activities and it hit me.  Old Maid was one of my favorite games to play as a little kid.

Why should you love them, too?
My students and I are quite obsessed with this game because it’s so fun and it is such great hands-on practice.
Win-win.
Here are just some of the reasons why I love OMG:
My students and I are quite obsessed with this game because it’s so fun and it is such great hands-on practice. Win-win. Here are just some of the reasons why I love OMG:10)  All students are engaged in learning.
9)  Students love the fact that it is a “game.”
8)  Even the most disinterested students get excited to play.
7)  Students are working collaboratively and self-checking one another.
6)  Prep the game once and you have it forever.  {Yay planning!}
5)  Great for a group of early finishers who are ready to quietly play before the next activity.
4)  Easy-to-run game that looks great during a walk-through observation.
3)  Takes about 30-40 minutes to play, leaving time for other activities/necessary routines in a one-hour class.
2)  Students are practicing a skill while having a blast.
1)  My students beg me to play.  They beg me to do math.  This makes my soul happy!

Try for free!
You can scoop up this Translating Algebraic Expressions game for 
FREE in my store.
You can scoop up this Translating Algebraic Expressions game for free in my store.


And if you and your students love this game as much as we do, I’ve made an affordable {growing} bundle that contains all of my current and future Old Math Guy games.
And if you and your students love this game as much as we do, I’ve made an affordable {growing} bundle that contains all of my current and future Old Math Guy games.



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