Implementing Error Analysis in Your Math Classroom

Implementing Error Analysis in Your Math Classroom


Too often teachers see students make the same mistakes over and over.  It’s been marked wrong, it’s been corrected for them, or it has been re-explained but nothing seems to make a difference.  Time to try error analysis!  When students become the teacher, they get a new perspective on the topic.  They need to analyze mistakes - not just stuff them into a folder never to be looked at again.  Check out these great ideas for implementing error analysis in your math class:

You’ve Got Math Talent!
Based on the popular television show, four judges ask questions about possible errors made in the featured work.  This process helps students to look over specific steps to determine whether it was completed correctly or incorrectly.  Students then place an “X” in the box where the answer is no (ie the error) and demonstrate the correct steps.  There is usually one mistake, but there can be none or two to ensure student work is thorough. These error analysis sheets are perfect for warm ups, in-class packet practice, stations, homework, and more!

Implementing Error Analysis in Your Math Classroom


Check out available topics, including:

Here’s what other educators are saying about these resources:
“What a great way to see if students really understand.”  -Mary M

“This activity was similar to a concept cartoon which is a literacy strategy I recently learned about at a PL.  I loved the creativity of the character names and so did my students.”  -Joy M

“I love having students find the errors…it really makes them think!”  -Elizabeth C

Try this free sample in your classroom!

PS - The clipart is by the super talented Sarah Pecorino Illustration!


Algebra Error Detection Practice
In this FREE worksheet by Mrs. E Teaches Math, students analyze common errors made in algebra.  This resource is designed to facilitate discussion among peers in order to more deeply understand the mathematical concepts.  This is a truly meaningful way to address these common misconceptions!  You can learn more about math misconceptions in geometry on Karrie’s blog.

Implementing Error Analysis in Your Math Classroom


Errorgram
Tyra from Algebra and Beyond has a super creative set of resources for Error Analysis.  Errorgram is modeled after Instagram.  Students identify, explain, and correct errors in a fun, relatable format.  Once the activity is completed, it also makes great classroom decor!  Learn more about these resources in this blog post. 
Implementing Error Analysis in Your Math Classroom


Quiz Evaluation
Quiz evaluations are a great reflective process that I have always used after a quiz.

Students fill in:
-Name of the Assessment
-Strength – This is something they did well.
-Challenge – This is something they struggled with.
-For each question where they lost points, students fill in the problem number, topic, number of points lost, then they check whether it was a simple mistake or they didn’t understand.
-Corrections or reflection are completed on the back.

Students learn to identify and fix their OWN errors.  This is a strategy that I implement after a formative assessment, such as a quiz, so that students learn from their mistakes and – hopefully – do not make the same error on the summative assessment, or test.

I am offering this handout exclusively free for blog readers here.
This resource is part of my Classroom Forms set:
Implementing Error Analysis in Your Math Classroom


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5 Reasons to Start Using Scavenger Hunts in Your Math Class Today

5 reasons to start using scavenger hunts in your math class today


Scavenger hunts are a favorite among teachers and students!  Here are 5 reasons to start using scavenger hunts in your math class today:

5) Ignite the Adolescent Brain
Movement ignites the adolescent brain and is a necessary part of the learning process.  Giving students a break from endless sitting provides a boost of energy and increases engagement, leading to more learning and better retention.   When it is time to sit back down and quietly take notes or complete bookwork, the energy received from completing the scavenger hunt will transfer to the next activity.

4) Foster Student Independence
Scavenger Hunts are self-checking so students learn to take more ownership over their learning and become more independent.  Students solve a problem then walk around the room to find their answer.  If they cannot find the answer, they know something went wrong.  They can check over their work, check the original problem, or collaborate with a peer.  This process also ensures that students are being reflective learners by finding their own mistakes and seeking the correct process and answer.

5 reasons to start using scavenger hunts in your math class today

3) Provide 1-on-1 Intervention
Once your students know how to complete a scavenger hunt, it pretty much runs itself.  Imagine having a classroom full of engaged students who can complete a practice activity on their own!  I use this time to check in with students on my radar as struggling with the topic.  I can provide one-on-one assistance as needed, then send them on their way and check in with other students.  Also amazing for the adolescent psyche, students are all so busy and engaged they don’t notice who is getting some extra scaffolding.

2) Build Retention
Periodic review helps to build retention.  Scavenger hunts can build retention when used as a spiral or end of unit review.  Scavenger hunts that cover a number of topics force students to think back to previously learned material, seek information from their notes, or readdress past topics through collaboration with peers or the instructor.  Great for standardized test or final exam preparation.

1) Students and teachers love them!
“This was an awesome activity!  My students loved it and it saved me so much time.  Thank you!”   -Ashton O

“I used this activity with my students the day before a break to let them get out of their seats for the scavenger hunt.  It was perfect, challenging, and got students to think.”   -Jaycie A

Great activity and so easy to check!  I need every scavenger hunt to be like this!”   -Kelly K

“This was the first scavenger hunt I did with my students.  It was easy to explain and my students were engaged.”   -Jennifer A

“My students enjoyed this activity.  It allowed some to work independently so that I was able to help those who were still struggling with the concept.”   -Dorothy N

5 reasons to start using scavenger hunts in your math class today

5 reasons to start using scavenger hunts in your math class today

I also found this New York Times article really interesting.  Check it out for more information about incorporating movement in the classroom.

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