Discover Math Intervention

Discover Math Intervention



Discover Math Intervention Membership

 I am so excited to tell you all about Discover Math Intervention! I dreamed up a new program, and it has totally come to life beyond all initial expectations!

The goal of the Discover Math Intervention Program is to provide teachers with the tools needed to implement math intervention digitally and easily.

The blueprint below demonstrates the flow of the program. For each topic, students take the diagnostic assessment. If they get two problems in a row incorrect, they are sent to a remediation video. After they work through the reteaching video and practice, they return to take/edit the diagnostic assessment again to demonstrate mastery. Some students will be able to submit without the remediation video if they demonstrate mastery on their first try. Then there is worksheet practice that can be printed or used digitally for additional reinforcement to build longterm retention.

The blueprint for Discover Math Intervention

The Discover Math Intervention Membership is a community of math teachers working together to serve our students in a digital environment.

The membership includes resources that help teachers can stay organized while implementing the program.  Student workbooks and teacher tools keep everyone on track throughout the intervention. Our Facebook community is available for support, suggestions, and advice.

This program is 100% differentiated. Every topic's assessment, video, and worksheet is available in two levels.

Math Intervention for Middle School Pin

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Frequently Asked Questions

How often will new content be added within the membership?
A new lesson will be added every Sunday. One week Level A will be posted and the next week Level B will be posted. This means two new topics are available per month.

What is the cost of the membership?
The cost as of September 2020 is $8.95/month or $97/year.

What happens if I cancel my membership?
Upon cancelation of the membership, your user license will be void and you will no longer be able to use any part of the program.

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Membership is only open a few times a year. Visit freetodiscover.mykajabi.com to become a member or join the waitlist.
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Choose Your Challenge: A Differentiation Strategy

Choose Your Challenge: A Differentiation Strategy




Okay, let's see if I can hit the nail on the head.
You want to differentiate for your students, but you don't know where to begin.
Or you want to meet the needs of all learners, but you are so overwhelmed and don't have enough time to do everything you need to do.
Or perhaps you haven't yet figured out how to make everything work in the digital environment we're living in.

Deep breath. Today I am going to give you two simple methods that you can utilize in order to differentiate one lesson. It's time to just start somewhere, and it will make a world of difference.

Method A: Two Levels

In this "Choose Your Challenge" differentiation strategy, you prepare two practice worksheets or activities for the same topic. One worksheet is on-level and one is slightly more advanced so that the students who are ready to move on can continue to be challenged.

When I present this to my students I ask them to be reflective. Do you feel like you need more practice with <insert topic> or are you ready for the next challenge?

Method B: Two Topics

In this strategy, you prepare two practice worksheets for different topics. Both topics are on-level, but students can choose which topic presents more of a challenge to them.

Tell students that there are two topics to choose from.  They should select the topic that they feel they need the most practice with.


You can:
  • Create the two worksheets. They do not need to be pretty. Write the problems you want them to practice on a piece of paper and copy.
  • Select two sets of practice problems out of your textbook. Most textbooks will increase the difficulty of practice problems as you move down the problem set. There can even be some overlap between the two assignments. For two topics, work from two different sections.
  • Find the two worksheets on websites like www.kutasoftware.com. You may need to do a little digging, but you will often be able to find two levels on the same topic. They also have tons of available topics to choose from!
  • Purchase the worksheets on Teachers Pay Teachers! I am super passionate about differentiation. Let me do the work for you!
If you want to learn more about the Discover Math Intervention Program that is 100% differentiated and digital, then visit me at freetodiscover.kajabi.com.
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How to Increase Your Students' Math Confidence {Part 3}

How to Increase Your Students' Math Confidence {Part 3}





Welcome back for Part 3 of this Student Confidence blog series! In part one, we addressed the role of skills fluency, written feedback, and student reflection in building students’ math confidence. In part two, we continued the discussion with a focus on routines, mixed groupings, and student interests. Today we’ll wrap up the conversation with three final ideas for increasing your students’ math confidence this year: differentiating based on interests and needs, embracing humor and creating a positive classroom climate, and using pictorial models in lessons.


7) Differentiate Based on Interests and Needs

Differentiation, as it relates to student confidence, has everything to do with student choice and ownership. By providing options, students can select practice activities that they find motivating and interesting. Get to know your students and what they enjoy doing outside of the regular school day, then create word problems around those themes. Students may have a choice between a horseback riding-themed worksheet and karate-themed worksheet. Then next time switch it up! The students for which those topics are important will go into the activity with increased confidence because they already understand the context. On the other hand, if you select themes that mean nothing to students, their confidence with attacking the problem with likely start lower because they do not understand the context.



Differentiating practice based on readiness is also a key component here. Provide two levels of practice on the same topic when you can. Then train students to choose the level that is at an appropriate challenge level for their individual needs on that day. Still trying to work through some confusion on a new topic? Then stick with the on-level version of the practice. Ready to move on to something a little more challenging? You’ve got something for them, too! When students work on assignments that are just within their reach, they’ll experience the most growth.








8) Embrace Humor

Learn to read your students. Lack of confidence, total overwhelm, and math anxiety can often be seen on your students’ faces. You’re teaching, and they’re like “yikes.” You can help your students to get out of this mental state by injecting humor in your classes. When you’re able to inject a small amount of age-appropriate humor and get off subject for a minute or two, students are able to take a deep breath and reset. A little bit of laughter can go a long way in reducing stress in that moment, and allow students to continue the lesson with a clear head and a better chance to learn something new. More on this with the next example…









9) Use Pictorial Models

Using multiple models is widely accepted as a good teaching practice, but have you considered how it can increase your students’ math confidence? Math becomes increasingly symbolic as students progress through school. Where you can, use pictorial models to increase student understanding. Did you know that the brain processes pictures about 60,000 times faster than text? Let that sink in. What?! 60,000 times faster. So if we are to consider brain-based learning, we better be creating pictorial models to teach our students and facilitate students’ creation of their own images to represent math content. Let’s think about this in terms of word problems. There are probably a few sentences of text for students to take in. No wonder many students get overwhelmed and lack confidence in their ability to attack this type of problem. Draw a picture to model the scenario. With your students, work through the problem; converting the words to pictures. This happens naturally with word problems that involve area or other types of measurement, but I’m talking even more generally than that. It’s a shopping problem? Draw a stick figure with a purse walking up to a counter. Seriously. I am the WORST artist, but this gives your students brain an image to latch on to and will boost retention and will, therefore, increase their confidence with this type of problem.



This ties into humor as well if you draw as poorly as I do. I was teaching word problems involving quadratic functions to my eighth grade Algebra 1 class a few years ago. Our textbook gave us a word problem about a cheetah pouncing from a ledge onto its prey. This could have gone a bunch of different ways, but I chose to draw some (terrible) drawings to show what was happening. They laughed at my awful artistry, which sky-rocketed engagement in the lesson. But guess what… they had a visual of that concave down parabola imprinted in their brain. So the next time they had to attack a similar word problem on their own, they knew just what to do.









Okay, math friends.



Are you convinced that math confidence is something we have the control to increase?



I have outlined NINE actionable strategies for increasing your students’ math confidence this year.



Did one resonate with you more than the others?



Try it out!!! Then check in and let me know how it went.











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How to Increase Your Students' Math Confidence {Part 2}

How to Increase Your Students' Math Confidence {Part 2}




In part one we discussed how to increase students’ math confidence by increasing skills fluency, providing specific written feedback, and engaging in reflections and corrections. Be sure to start there if you missed it. Today we’ll discuss how establishing routines, utilizing mixed groupings, and differentiating and planning based on student interests can help increase students’ math confidence.





1) Establish Routines
We know routines are an important part of classroom management. But have you thought about how establishing routines can help increase your students’ math confidence? When students know what to expect each day, they don’t need to spend much brainpower thinking about (or worrying about) what to expect. I recently read Atomic Habits* by James Clear. His research on habits is very much related to what we do as teachers in our classrooms. According to Clear, “Habit formation is the process by which a behavior becomes progressively more automatic through repetition. The more you repeat an activity, the more the structure of your brain changes to becomes efficient at that activity.” This is great news for teachers! Take the time to make your classroom routine automatic for your students, and their brain will actually become more efficient at it at a neurological level. When students can automatically arrive to class, follow the opening routine, and look at an agenda to see what to expect, they will feel more confident in their ability to meet or exceed expectations in that setting.



*I highly recommend this New York Times Bestseller to anyone looking to make improvement in their life through habit formation.



2) Utilize Mixed Groupings

It so challenging to create seating arrangements and groupings in middle school. You need to consider preferred seating accommodations, relationships, behaviors, and so much more. Taking the time to find the sweet spot to the best of your ability will pay off. Mixed grouping refers to having a variety of ability-levels together in one group. Mixed groupings work best when the positive peer model in a group or pairing is open to helping others and has modeled inclusive behavior. They should be respected by peers to the extent that others will accept their instruction and advice. It is also important that they understand that they should not do all the work for the group, but instead should serve as a leader to initiate discussions and work through problems together. To set expectations you may want to have one-on-one discussion with the peer model or group discussions with all students to ensure the group dynamics run successfully.









Once you have established mixed groupings, the benefits will be amazing to witness. Students who might not normally feel confident speaking in front of the whole class may be more willing to offer ideas and suggestions within a small group setting. Perhaps they will feel more confident taking risks by sharing ideas: a rarity in the middle school classroom. There are also benefits for the peer model students who may feel more confident after teaching and leading a small group of classmates. When one teaches others, they further instill the knowledge in their own mind and may even make new connections between mathematical ideas. Win-win. Utilizing mixed groupings will increase students’ math confidence for students working at any level.





3) Plan Based on Student Interests

I want to start with an anecdote here. When teaching high school students in an alternative education program how to determine the vertex of a quadratic function given different forms of the equation, I was getting some blank stares. It was, after all, a somewhat bland topic to develop the skills before diving deeper into the concept. One student in particular looked like he was about read to give up. We’ll call him Nathan. Nathan was totally lacking confidence in his math ability. He wanted to learn and do well, but he didn’t really believe in himself and the current methods were not helping him make the connections between math concepts that he needed. I noticed that Nathan really liked to draw, design, and color. Whenever he had free time, he would work on his clothing line sketches. Aha, Nathan is a budding artist who finds stress relief from art I realized. That night I went home and created a color-by-number activity to practice the math skill. It was a huge hit among all my students, but especially Nathan. Towards the end of class, he looked at me and said “I think you’re really trying to teach me. And it’s working.” I still get chills when I think about this moment.









Why am I sharing this? I believe it’s important to build relationships with your students and get to know their unique needs and interests. When making up word problems this could be a simple as using current students’ names or using scenarios that relate to the interests of particular students. If you have a student who loves horseback riding, create a real-world application about horseback riding. When students can connect to math concepts through their personal interests, they will experience greater engagement and increased confidence in their ability to solve the problem.






So friends, I don’t think I’m done here. I feel strongly that math confidence is the first step on the path to success in learning math. Comment below to let me know what you have found most striking or helpful. I plan to continue the series with more ideas for increasing students’ math confidence.



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